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Most Representative Move

PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2001 8:13 pm
by LarryC
I have heard it said, and do believe, that ALL the moves of the set encapsulate the basic tenets of taiji. But, hypothetically, in a demonstration to "outsiders not familiar with taijiā€, if you had to choose one move (or a short series of moves) that demonstrate taiji principles, which move(s) would it(they) be?

Now, addressing yourself to the audience of taiji players on this bb who already are (at least intellectually) familiar with the ten essentials, why did you choose the above move(s)?


[This message has been edited by LarryC (edited 02-17-2001).]

[This message has been edited by LarryC (edited 02-17-2001).]

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2001 9:29 pm
by JerryKarin
Yang Jun's reply:

If I were asked to select one move or set of moves as a way to introduce taiji to someone unfamiliar with it, personally I would select grasp the bird's tail. The reason is that, relatively speaking, grasp the bird's tail is not too complicated, it contains the basic footwork, torso techniques, and hand techniques, and in addition most people are able to perform it. If we discuss it from a deeper level of analysis, grasp the bird's tail contains the four types of energies: peng, lu, ji, and an. Moreover, the basic circling practice of push hands utilizes these same four types of energy. So this set of moves can help people who don't understand much about taijiquan to progress from the shallow to the more profound in their understanding of taijiquan.

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2001 8:35 pm
by Steve
Also, it doesn't hurt that every book, magazine, video or instructor I've ever dealt with refers to Grasp the Bird's Tail as "Yang style Taijiquan's signature sequence."

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2001 8:47 pm
by Mike
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by JerryKarin:
<B>Yang Jun's reply:

If I were asked to select one move or set of moves as a way to introduce taiji to someone unfamiliar with it, personally I would select grasp the bird's tail. The reason is that, relatively speaking, grasp the bird's tail is not too complicated, it contains the basic footwork, torso techniques, and hand techniques, and in addition most people are able to perform it. If we discuss it from a deeper level of analysis, grasp the bird's tail contains the four types of energies: peng, lu, ji, and an. Moreover, the basic circling practice of push hands utilizes these same four types of energy. So this set of moves can help people who don't understand much about taijiquan to progress from the shallow to the more profound in their understanding of taijiquan.</B></font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


I would probably add the comment that the reason is as Jerry said, "Grasp Bird's Tail" (which is the homophone error of "lan que wei" which Wu Yu Xiang couldn't understand from the provincial Yang Lu Chan trying to say "lan cha yi")contains the 4 directions of peng jin... peng, lu, ji, and an. The posture/applications of "Grasp Sparrow's Tail" are themselves not as important as learning the 4 jins. And the 4 jins can be applied to any number of moves (in fact, all moves are comprised of peng, lu, ji, and an). Once you understand the 4 directions of jin, you understand the circle in the square and your foot is in the door for Taiji.

Regards,

Mike Sigman

PostPosted: Mon Oct 18, 2004 2:22 pm
by taoistx
Hi,

Can anyone explain the quote

"Grasp Bird's Tail" (which is the homophone error of "lan que wei" which Wu Yu Xiang couldn't understand from the provincial Yang Lu Chan trying to say "lan cha yi")

I am studying another style of Tai Chi which uses Grasp the Bird's Tail as a sequence name and am interested in its origin