The 49 Form--how long ago invented

The 49 Form--how long ago invented

Postby Joan » Wed Sep 14, 2011 5:57 pm

I notice that the 49 form is now on the Yang Family website. Is this a new form? I was only aware of the 103 and the short form. How long has it been practiced?
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Re: The 49 Form--how long ago invented

Postby ruben » Thu Sep 15, 2011 8:11 pm

Dear Joan,
I think Master Yang Zhenduo developed 49 Form by mid-eighties and in 1997, the form became the official Yang Family Competition and demonstration form. There are the same movements as in 103 Form, but without repetitions, so, in a competition, it could be done between 7 - 8 minutes.
Greetings,

Rubén
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Re: The 49 Form--how long ago invented

Postby Joan » Fri Sep 16, 2011 1:12 am

Thanks, Ruben for the explanation of the 49 form. Is it learned more often now than the short form?
I find it very interesting and will begin working on it. I know the short and long forms and now will have something else to work on.
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Re: The 49 Form--how long ago invented

Postby Audi » Wed Oct 05, 2011 2:11 am

Hi Joan,

When people in the US talk about the "short form," they are usually referring to the form that Cheng Man-Ch'ing developed. He was one of the first to popularize Tai Ch'i in the U.S., and his form remains quite popular. I believe that some people that have followed his legacy and understanding have also gone back to the longer traditional form, but preserving his flavor. The first form I learned was such a form.

Many other teachers have also created shortened versions of the traditional form and call them by various names. A few others have even created "new" long versions of the form, while still calling what they do "Yang Style." I say all this because although most experienced Tai Chi players in the U.S. will understand a reference to the "Short Form," this version of the form has been adopted only by those following Cheng Man-Ch'ing's legacy. Other Yang Style players do not really talk about a long form and a short form. Most such players would also probably care less about the sequence and number of postures than about the flavor which is given to the performance of the postures. A person doing the 103 with Cheng Man-Ch'ing's flavor will look quite different from someone performing the same postures, but with the Association's flavor.

In the Association we are urged to use the 103-movement (also counted by some as 108 or 85) form for our general practice. As Rubén has described, we also learn and teach a 49-movement form that is used primarily for demonstration or competition purposes. Some also practice it right after practicing the 103 in order to lengthen their practice session. We also have a 16-movement form that I believe was designed to be used in college curricula in China and a 13-movement form that most use as an introduction to Tai Chi for those not yet inclined or able to learn the traditional 103.

I hope this helps clarify things.

Take care,
Audi
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