Time of Long Form

Time of Long Form

Postby mls_72 » Mon Sep 23, 2013 3:54 pm

Something interesting I recently noticed...I was getting acupuncture and I asked the doctor if certain ailments require longer or shorter acupuncture times. His response was that there was an ancient text that describes the qi circulates to all the points in the body in one cycle anywhere from 50-60 times a day which is anywhere between 24-28 minutes depending on the person. So he says 30 minutes is enough for the "qi" to reach all the needles.

In Taiji Long form, i was first taught to do in 20 minutes.... having been studying and timing the Yang form from Yang Zhen Dou's/Yang Jun's video they do the form in about 27 minutes. I am wondering if this is based on the TCM qi circulation theory.

I mentioned it to my doctor and he said (he teaches long form) that Taiji practice speed really is based on how the individual breathes, some people can do long breathing where they can do 2 cycles of inhale and exhale in one minute. Also he said enough practice is done when you reach the point you are just about to sweat.

What i got out of it.... is to do no less than 30 minutes of training to get a nice healthy cycle of Qi flow to all the meridians through Taijiquan training.

is there an official time the Long form should take?
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Re: Time of Long Form

Postby Audi » Mon Sep 30, 2013 1:16 am

Hi Matt,

I generally do the form in 25 to 30 minutes, according to the speed I have internalized from seminars. I go by feeling rather than the clock. I do not recall what speed is actually recommended, but I think it was between 20-30 minutes, but that other speeds are possible depending upon your purpose and level of training. Since we are supposed to keep our breathing even and long, I think that is one way to judge speed.

Take care,
Audi
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Re: Time of Long Form

Postby Bob Ashmore » Mon Sep 30, 2013 7:57 pm

I don't know if this would constitute an official time for the form, but this video of Yang Zhen Duo doing the Traditional 103 Hand Form runs for 23:48.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDgG4zze8wU
I tend to shoot for 20 minute hand forms myself when "going for record" though I can, and sometimes do, play a fast form in about seven minutes or so but that's for a different benefit than doing the slow ones.
I usually land somewhere in between 17 and 22 minutes when I move at my "normal" pace.
I know, that means my "normal pace" varies quite a bit.
There are many factors at work; my mood when I start, my mood as I continue, the time of day, the amount of light, the freshness of the air, the company I'm in, if I'm alone, if I've drank coffee and if so how much coffee I drank, is it Tuesday?
Etc.
As a human being I am not going to move at exactly the same pace every single time I play a form.
If I could play the form at exactly the same speed and intensity every time I did it I think I'd be known as "Robot Bob" instead of Bob Bu Hao!

Bob
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Re: Time of Long Form

Postby yslim » Mon Sep 30, 2013 8:37 pm

Bob Ashmore wrote:I don't know if this would constitute an official time for the form, but this video of Yang Zhen Duo doing the Traditional 103 Hand Form runs for 23:48.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDgG4zze8wU
I tend to shoot for 20 minute hand forms myself when "going for record" though I can, and sometimes do, play a fast form in about seven minutes or so but that's for a different benefit than doing the slow ones.
I usually land somewhere in between 17 and 22 minutes when I move at my "normal" pace.
I know, that means my "normal pace" varies quite a bit.
There are many factors at work; my mood when I start, my mood as I continue, the time of day, the amount of light, the freshness of the air, the company I'm in, if I'm alone, if I've drank coffee and if so how much coffee I drank, is it Tuesday?
Etc.
As a human being I am not going to move at exactly the same pace every single time I play a form.
If I could play the form at exactly the same speed and intensity every time I did it I think I'd be known as "Robot Bob" instead of Bob Bu Hao!

Bob


Hi Bob,

From the way it sounded that your mind was too busy and/or you have a "monkey-mind" moment,Ha ha. Sorry Bob I just couldn't help it because IT makes me do it.

I always thought it is a good rule that one should empty ones mind and listen to the silent with no timing in mind before the starting of Taijiquan. Even after one reaches the end of the "closing posture" one should have forgotten about the time by then. At that "moment of here and now" it was feeling so good I want to feel it forever more.....Time? what time.

Just to share my Taiji doing stuff..Try it and you might like it. It could calm your mind.

Ciao, and have a good Taiji day.
yslim
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Re: Time of Long Form

Postby Bob Ashmore » Tue Oct 01, 2013 12:21 pm

I don't know if that's how I'd have described it, but I certainly can't blame you for not passing on the dig. :lol:
I've had more than my fair share of monkey mind, that's for sure.
And I would be lying if I said that outside factors don't influence my form work.
I know they do, so instead of attempting to overcome them I take them into consideration and actually have learned to embrace them.
State of mind is obviously critical to the practice of T'ai Chi Ch'uan. Keeping that in mind, I find that in order to "be in the moment" it's very important to know what moment I'm in.
How can anyone "be in the moment" if they're not in tune with their mood and their surroundings?
Your mood and surroundings...
Those ARE the moment.
Sometimes monkey mind is the moment, sometimes complete calm, other times it's somewhere in between.
Mood happens, you can't stop it no matter how hard you try, so I feel it's better to embrace your mood, even own it, than it is to deny it or try to "work past" it.
It's never been possible, not for me anyway, to completely disregard my mood and slip "into the moment". I find that my mood is the moment.
So I work with that.

Bob
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