Chi

Re: Chi

Postby ChiDragon » Mon Apr 11, 2016 12:03 am

This character was used to represent all other characters inclusively. Who ever read a text, actually, the reader has to determine what the contextual meaning is. Otherwise, a misinterpretation will result. Unfortunately, any reader can be making the common linguistic error, even most native born Chinese. Sorry to say, they had translated "chi" as "energy" and confused the whole world. Hence, all the non-natives see the character will have the word "energy" flashed in their minds. As result, the misinterpretation of the text will be misleading everybody.

In traditional Chinese, the character was used to represent 炁, 气 and 氣. By knowing the distinction of the characters, one may be able to interpret its contextual meaning in a sentence properly. For the same token, it goes to the simplified Chinese also.

In simplified Chinese, the character was used to represent 炁, 气 and 氣.

In the thread, lucky enough that we have one member; like Audi had mastered and given some good examples for the usage and application of the character chi. I will review some of the examples for a point of interest and clarification. Thanks!
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Re:

Postby ChiDragon » Mon Apr 11, 2016 9:47 pm

Wushuer wrote:I have heard the whole gambit on this one. The answer I got when I first asked what chi (qi) is and how do I feel it was from a Wu family member who simply told me "Breathe" and stood looking at me politely.

I asked if that was all it was, he said, "Breathe, breathe deep, breathe better, breathe with your whole body and sink that breath here", then he poked me in the belly with one hand and my lower back with the other and kind of circled his hands around my waist.

When I told him I didn't understand he had me do horse stance third eye meditation for a long, long time while he watched me and made corrections to how I breathed and how I stood.

..... he told me to stand up but keep breathing the same way.

He later told me the trick was to keep it circulating, to "sink it to the tantien and keep it going, let it travel through your whole body with no interruptions" .....


It seems to me that everybody is looking for the answer for chi but ignoring or trying to deny what was given in front. It was loud and clear that breathing is what chi kung is all about. Don't you see that one cannot stay away from the air, breath and breathing when the term "chi" emerges? Don't you realize it was always returned to haunt you? Don't you want to settle this once and for all...???

The description on breathing while doing the horse stance is a must for all styles other than just the Wu family. In martial arts or wushu, it is inevitable that the term "chi" always comes up. If one ignores it, then one is depriving oneself to acquire the most effective realm of the practice. One can practice for years will never reach the ultimate goal of the practice; and still wondering why it didn't work.

The ancients knew that breathing is very important for health and one's physical being. Due to lack of the physiology knowledge, they can only explain chi to their best ability. The ancient had discovered that by breathing slowly and deeply constantly will increase their physical strength and improve health. A breathing method was developed and employed by the past Taoists. I called the UMB, the Ultimate Method of Breathing.

Let's go back more than two thousand years ago. BY assuming that the ancients did not have the modern scientific knowledge as we do. Hence, they didn't know what was in space. They only knew that there was something like a "vital energy", in the universe to sustain human life. So, they called it (chi). Hereinafter, whatever was in space or in the human body, the ancients always tried to refer it to the term (chi). Sometimes, they borrow the term for something else. Unfortunately, each group of people uses the term which is so esoteric and made it only they can understand. In the past and present, the obfuscation of the term had made it so unfathomable and confusing when one come across it. Of course, it can be exoteric by going to ask some experts.

I think that was exactly what Wushuer did. However, even the expert cannot put it in words. The only thing one can be enlightened is by performing the practice with one's own intuition.

Please don't go away, there is more to come..... :)
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Re: Chi

Postby ChiDragon » Wed Apr 13, 2016 10:09 pm

Greetings again:
I have three versions in the understanding of chi.
1. The traditional way which was told by the ancient Taoists and passed on.
2. The traditional way with a little bit of modern science flavor.
3. A more conclusive explanation with a scientific approach.

I would like to share my view with you all and please give me your opinion.

Version 1
In the ancient, the Taoists wanted to have good health and longevity. So, they were searching different methods to prolong life. Somehow, they knew there is something in the universe which sustain human life. Thus they called it (chi). They thought by having the chi circulating inside the body will vitalize all parts of the body. If a lot more chi was collected will give a better health which might prolong life also. With this notion in mind, they thought that more chi can be collected was by inhale deeply and slowly with the abdomen fully expanded; then, exhale with the abdomen fully contracted to empty out the bad chi. Furthermore, in order to send chi to different parts of the body, it was done with the intent of the mind by focusing different areas of the body.

Please keep in mind that the ancient Taoists didn't know how the respiratory and the circulatory systems work. Hence, to them, by breathing deeply was to collect and store chi in the abdomen. At the time, they call the abdomen as tan tian(丹田). The above description has been known as "sink chi to the tan tian(氣沈丹田)".
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Re: Chi

Postby ChiDragon » Fri Apr 15, 2016 5:55 pm

2. The traditional way with a little bit of modern science flavor.

Version 2
In the modern time, the idea of oxygen discovered in the air was introduced. However, those who practiced martial arts by not having a full understanding about the oxygen and blood, then a conclusion was reached by assuming that the oxygen and blood were driven by Chi inside the body. Hence, the credit was still given to Chi for the energetic effect on the human body.
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Re: Chi

Postby ChiDragon » Mon Apr 18, 2016 9:25 pm

3. A more conclusive explanation with a scientific approach.
Version 3
Versions 1 and 2 have one thing in common which is breathing. Version 1 only know Chi existed in the breath. Version 2 mentioned Chi and oxygen. However, some said chi is driven the blood and oxygen throughout the body; and some said it was the chi and oxygen flow in the blood and delivered throughout the body. What else is there in the blood which might be contribute to invigorate the human body? If chi was given all the credit to vitalize the body, then, what happen if there were no nourishment and oxygen in the blood? Can a human body survive with Chi alone? The answer could be yes or no; but it depends how Chi was defined.

Since Chi was not defined by the ancient Taoist, thus we can speculate or interterprete its contextual meaning in the text. Is there anything in common with Chi and oxygen? Could oxygen be the same as Chi all along that once thought they were two separate things.

In modern science, the energy in the human was generated by cell respiration. It is a biological process in generating the ATP energy. The ATP energy was the decomposition of glucose by oxygen. The ATP energy only lasted in few seconds. If the body did not use up all the ATP, then it will be vanished in no time. Therefore, it must be regenerated as soon it was consumed or vanished. In order to have the ATP to be regenerated perpetually, lots of oxygen must be provided constantly.

From the above scenario, Chi can be defined as oxygen in the blood, and also can be recognized as the ATP energy. Since Chi can be defined as a gaseous substance or vital energy. However, its definition should be used wisely and not be obfuscated. One should make interpretations based on the contextual meaning instead of given one word-meaning translation.

Tai Ji gives energy to human body; there is something one should remember to learn something about Chi. One will appreciate more about Tai Ji if the cell respiration was full understood.
The biochemical formula:
glucose + oxygen = H2O + CO2 + heat + energy


Happy breathing,
Wu Wei Taoist
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Re: Chi

Postby UniTaichi » Mon Feb 27, 2017 5:59 am

So, with what I know I can deduce that
Internal Power=Mass(quantity of chi) x (accelleration)electric flow through connection, free to flow as efficiently as possible through unblocked pathways, creating speed) and harnessed and directed my the mind intent.


Hi Paslchemist,

I was going through old posting when I came across this posting. I was really excited about it as I shared your breakdown on Internal Power. I was actually debating how to get it across since end of last year and this is the platform I need.

But first, are you still visiting this site ? Also since your ''theory'' is dated back to 2003, have you got any updates or understanding on it.

Awaiting your reply.

Cheers,
UniTaichi

P>S> I have yesterday posted this on another thread, which is related to this ''theroy'' .This was my explanation on 4 jin moving 1000 jin. under Push Hand section.

[quote]DPasek,

Why would they choose 4 liang rather than just 1 liang if it was only an idiom to represent a small force vs. a large force? It is reasonable to think that 1000 jin may just represent any large force, but why use 4 liang to represent any small force?


My explanation ; 4 liang of li is used (is enough) to generate a internal force to overwhelm 1000 jin. [/quote]
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Re: Chi

Postby yslim » Tue Feb 28, 2017 4:21 am

[quote="Why would they choose 4 liang rather than just 1 liang if it was only an idiom to represent a small force vs. a large force? It is reasonable to think that 1000 jin may just represent any large force, but why use 4 liang to represent any small force?


"My explanation ; 4 liang of li is used (is enough) to generate a internal force to overwhelm 1000 jin. [/quote][/quote]"

Hi,
If it was only an idiom to represent a small force vs.a large force. The only small force I could think of can do this would be a yin yang complimentary force. Because of this; Taiji have yin(1 liang) yang(1 liang),but yin yang is not taiji. To be Taiji yin yang must be one. To be one you need the three, neutral(1 liang). Someone(1 liang) have to be there to connect that 1000 jin.

Or try this; one (Wuji 1 liang) give birth to two (yin 2 liang and yang 3 liang). Two give birth to three (the neutral 4liang). Three give birth to 10,000 things.
Ciao, yslim
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Re: Chi

Postby UniTaichi » Tue Feb 28, 2017 3:41 pm

Hi yslim,

If it was only an idiom to represent a small force vs.a large force. The only small force I could think of can do this would be a yin yang complimentary force. Because of this; Taiji have yin(1 liang) yang(1 liang),but yin yang is not taiji. To be Taiji yin yang must be one. To be one you need the three, neutral(1 liang). Someone(1 liang) have to be there to connect that 1000 jin.



I did not take it as an idiom but your explanation is interesting. My take is a physical/internal thingy :
using 4 liang of force to generate an internal power enough to move 1000 jin.

Or try this; one (Wuji 1 liang) give birth to two (yin 2 liang and yang 3 liang). Two give birth to three (the neutral 4liang). Three give birth to 10,000 things.


My understanding is Wuji = 0 , Taiji = 1 , Yin/Yang = 2 . We learn Taiji using the theory of Yin/Yang to return to Wuji/Void/Emptiness/Kong.

Cheers,
UniTaichi
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Re: Chi

Postby ChiDragon » Tue Feb 28, 2017 6:39 pm

四兩撥千斤 is an idiom in martial arts. Especially, it was used by the Tai Chi Quan practitioners.

兩 and 斤 are the two units in the ancient Chinese weight system. They are analogous to ounce and pound in the English system. There are 16 liang() in one jin(). Thus 4 liang is, 4/16, a quarter jin.

The translation for 四兩撥千斤 is:
Using a quarter jin to sway a thousand times the force of jin.

The word "sway" is used to translate for the character . The real interpretation for its application is:
If there is a strong force like 1000 jin coming at you, instead of facing head to head to counteract with equal weight, you would sway it away from the side of the brutal force. It is only require a small amount to do so. You can change the direction of the brutal force by swaying the force one inch or a hair away from your body. Hence, the force would have missed its target by the alteration of its direction.
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