the application of soft push hands

the application of soft push hands

Postby fumin » Mon Nov 24, 2008 12:18 am

http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/lVkftiremtQ/

The first vedio yield and neutralize the deflect-intercept-punch and discuss the timing and space

http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/ce0d2a-V4I8/

The second vedio shows while the application is on, the momentum is not hard rejection and loosely being hit but the way of Taichi quan is running smoothly like water.

http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/PUwIjMKrRlI/

The third vedio displays that following the opponetn up and down is hard for the opponent to get in and then shows little gudide pulling wiht lean forward by the whole body.

Fumin

Welcom any suggestion
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Postby Jamie » Thu Nov 27, 2008 3:26 am

Hi Fumin,


It is nice to see people practice fine points of tuishou with light energy.

In the second video I like the point of following even if moved. Some times this is safer - to fly away like a bird and use the partner's energy to put yourself in a safe position. Sometimes you can catch to partner and send them out with their own momentum if your timing is excellent.

I like the third video since the parnter has nothing to push. If you give no resistance then the partner cannot have a sucessful attack. It reminds me of the Classics - I alone know my partner, he does not know me.

However, in the first video the older gentleman uses avoid well but loses the superior position for a moment. When he is at the side his position looks like it cannot support or change and is open to right ward-off (peng). But is it hard to say for certain from a video.
Also, do you practice with heavy energy sometimes? It is the only way to check if your techniques are correct. When heavy pushing is used then you can see if you can remain relaxed and change, avoid, support, etc... in my opinion.
Overall I like your videos and your spirit of practice very much. Best wishes.


www.dongfangtaiji.com
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Postby fumin » Thu Nov 27, 2008 7:27 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Jamie:
<B>Hi Fumin,


It is nice to see people practice fine points of tuishou with light energy.

In the second video I like the point of following even if moved. Some times this is safer - to fly away like a bird and use the partner's energy to put yourself in a safe position. Sometimes you can catch to partner and send them out with their own momentum if your timing is excellent.

I like the third video since the parnter has nothing to push. If you give no resistance then the partner cannot have a sucessful attack. It reminds me of the Classics - I alone know my partner, he does not know me.

However, in the first video the older gentleman uses avoid well but loses the superior position for a moment. When he is at the side his position looks like it cannot support or change and is open to right ward-off (peng). But is it hard to say for certain from a video.
Also, do you practice with heavy energy sometimes? It is the only way to check if your techniques are correct. When heavy pushing is used then you can see if you can remain relaxed and change, avoid, support, etc... in my opinion.
Overall I like your videos and your spirit of practice very much. Best wishes.


www.dongfangtaiji.com

</B></font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hi,Jamie
You see the third video and find the weakpoint from the old man. Actually, the old man pretendly reject the opponent with a little strength by ward off. That's why he was thrown away. Also, he shows if he hit back in a wrong angle,then he was doomed.

I'll see if there is a heavy push video to present.

Thank you for the enlightened response.

cheers
Fumin
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Postby Danny » Sat Dec 13, 2008 3:50 am

Hello Fumin!

I really enjoyed your video clips of push hands...you seem to be the epitome of "soft"!

I am curious as to where you studied T'ai Chi and what is your lineage?


In Friendship,

Danny Emerick
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Postby fumin » Sat Dec 13, 2008 4:58 pm

This is my website, and you can watch the vedios. In the future, if I have more, I'll
post up. Personally, I like to handle the martial arts in a soft way.

My lineage is from Yang, Tien Zao-lin, Qian xi-qiao to his son Qian Yuen-nan.
Qian Yuen-nan in Taiway is my sifu. He is a friend of Dr.Tao Bien-xiang, a disciple of Master Chen Man-ching. Because my sifu admires Dr.Tao. Then I was introduced to Dr.Tao. All I have learned Chen Man-ching styles from these two sifus. Both of them passed away. A book Lao Zi written by Chen Man-ching from my sifu Qien influences my Taichi a great deal. Now, I am trying to carry out the classic principles of Chang San-feng and Wang Zhuong-yue.

Now, I'm in Los Angeles.

Watch the videos.
Thank you. Take cares

http://www.tudou.com/home/_35048146
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Postby Danny » Sat Dec 13, 2008 5:31 pm

Hello again Fumin!

Yes, I THOUGHT you had studied with Dr. T'ao by the way you moved in your video clips!

Very Nice!

I lived in Taipei from 1981-1985 and studied T'ai Chi with Mr. Liu Hsi-heng, another senior disciple of Prof. Cheng.

I saw Dr. T'ao many times in Taiwan in the 1980's, and I have T'ai Chi friends who knew him for over 40 years...and they all say that the only one softer was Prof. Cheng!

I regret that I never had the chance to push hands with Dr. T'ao. I had planned to attend one of his workshops here in states, but unfortunately he passed away too soon.

He was one of the last of the few remaining senior students of Prof. Cheng who really had both something to teach, and unique skill to demonstrate it! You are so fortunate to have been his student!

I would love to hear more of your training with Dr. T'ao and with Mr. Qian!

Please feel free to E-mail me at:

dannyemerick@yahoo.com


In Friendship,

Danny Emerick
Tallahassee, Florida
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Postby fumin » Tue Dec 16, 2008 2:26 am

Here are possible and continuous application of taichi postures aiming at energy receiving and shooting.

http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/ZlwMuI9gB9g/
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Postby fumin » Sun Dec 28, 2008 4:45 am

Enjoy push hands with my friend.
four postures push-hands.
Free push-hands.
Free fighting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mACGUDKro80
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZvsLietg40
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqoC07mbWvM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yz8TaoPeKG0

Fumin

[This message has been edited by fumin (edited 12-27-2008).]
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Postby yslim » Sun Dec 28, 2008 8:40 am

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by fumin:
<B>Enjoy push hands with my friend.
four postures push-hands.
Free push-hands.
Free fighting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mACGUDKro80
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YZvsLietg40
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqoC07mbWvM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yz8TaoPeKG0

Fumin

[This message has been edited by fumin (edited 12-27-2008).]</B></font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hello Master Fumin

I enjoy you enjoy push hand with friends.
Thank you for sharing your high level of skill. Wondering if you teach in L.A.?

Kung Hay Fa Choy to you all.
Ciao,
yslim
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Postby fumin » Sun Dec 28, 2008 11:48 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by yslim:
<B> Hello Master Fumin

I enjoy you enjoy push hand with friends.
Thank you for sharing your high level of skill. Wondering if you teach in L.A.?

Kung Hay Fa Choy to you all.
Ciao,
yslim</B></font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hello yslim:
Happy New Year to you, too.
Yes, I am starting in LA to teach the two friends in the park.
One is learning 108 styles in Taiwan and the other is learning 85 of Fu Chong-wen system in mainland China. They are interested in my way and want to know more.
Then I begin to teach. If you are closed, then welcome to join us on every Saturday morning.

Also, happy new year to all on this net.
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Postby Danny » Thu Jan 01, 2009 12:08 am

Hello Fred!

Wonderful videos of "soft" push hands!

I can clearly see the influence of Dr. Tao Ping-siang in your techniques and responses!

He may have been the softest of all of Cheng Man-ch'ing's students!

Hope to see some more of your video clips in the future!


In friendship,

Danny Emerick
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Postby fumin » Mon Jan 05, 2009 12:12 am

Here's chicken standing on one foot.

Make two compared. One is sink and relaxed. The other is not sink and relaxed.

So, the result is different.
It's only a demo.

http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/11o1ZlZSKPI/
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Postby Audi » Sun Feb 08, 2009 4:42 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by fumin:
<B>Here's chicken standing on one foot.

Make two compared. One is sink and relaxed. The other is not sink and relaxed.

So, the result is different.
It's only a demo.

http://www.tudou.com/programs/view/11o1ZlZSKPI/</B></font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thank you for the videos. They have been very interesting to watch.

As I study this last one, I find it interesting how different people may see different things depending on their viewpoint and the focus of their study.

When I look at this last video clip, what I notice first is that in the first Golden Rooster, you use your knee and foot to trap the fullness in the lower body of your partner, thus preventing the attack. In the second one, you look double weighted; whereas your partner looks free to bring the energy out of his left leg to push you.

By the way, in the other video clips, it seems that a frequent response you have to your partner's disconnection is to show a strike, usually a single or double punch. Is this a principle of your practice and teaching? I do not think I can recall seeing anyone show a punch (or perhaps a push with the fists?) during this type of push hands?

I recall that when practicing some very light and friendly push hands with one of my teachers, he once warned me that I kept disconnecting in order to try to do something. I am no longer certain of his full meaning, but I think he said that in the "old days," if one partner disconnected, this gave permission for the other partner to use a strike. It may also be that he was simply warning me that disconnecting in the way I as doing made me vulnerable to a strike. In either case, it made me more mindful of this problem.

At the time my teacher gave me this warning, I had 98% confidence in his ability not to hurt me, but there was still 2% of nervousness coming from stories of Yang Shaohou slamming students around. This 2% was enough to focus me very quickly on learning not to disconnect, at least for that session.

Your video clips brought this experience to mind, since you seemed to demonstrate a very elegant way of showing strikes with little chance of any actual injury. You showed more of a push with the fists, than an actual strike.

In my own practice, I sometimes ask my partners to tap or slap me on the head, if my movements are not appropriate to defend me properly. Similarly ,if my partner is not controlling my arm appropriately, I will sometimes demonstrate a hammer strike to the abdomen to show their vulnerability. Such techniques seem to be a way to help lead the mind intent (Yi) to change the movements, expecially for those with martial arts backgrounds who understand what danger they are putting themselves in. For those without such backgrounds, it would be good to have another tool to use.

At my current level of push hands practice, I am only a little bit concerned with free fighting, but I have become increasingly focused on small details of hand and finger placement that make it harder for my partner to disconnect. In doing applications, I am also trying to be more mindful of "connecting" and "losing" (lian/diu). This was also a reason that led me to notice your use of the fist.

Take care,
Audi
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Postby fumin » Tue Feb 10, 2009 6:11 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Audi:
<B> Thank you for the videos. They have been very interesting to watch.

As I study this last one, I find it interesting how different people may see different things depending on their viewpoint and the focus of their study.

When I look at this last video clip, what I notice first is that in the first Golden Rooster, you use your knee and foot to trap the fullness in the lower body of your partner, thus preventing the attack. In the second one, you look double weighted; whereas your partner looks free to bring the energy out of his left leg to push you.

By the way, in the other video clips, it seems that a frequent response you have to your partner's disconnection is to show a strike, usually a single or double punch. Is this a principle of your practice and teaching? I do not think I can recall seeing anyone show a punch (or perhaps a push with the fists?) during this type of push hands?

I recall that when practicing some very light and friendly push hands with one of my teachers, he once warned me that I kept disconnecting in order to try to do something. I am no longer certain of his full meaning, but I think he said that in the "old days," if one partner disconnected, this gave permission for the other partner to use a strike. It may also be that he was simply warning me that disconnecting in the way I as doing made me vulnerable to a strike. In either case, it made me more mindful of this problem.

At the time my teacher gave me this warning, I had 98% confidence in his ability not to hurt me, but there was still 2% of nervousness coming from stories of Yang Shaohou slamming students around. This 2% was enough to focus me very quickly on learning not to disconnect, at least for that session.

Your video clips brought this experience to mind, since you seemed to demonstrate a very elegant way of showing strikes with little chance of any actual injury. You showed more of a push with the fists, than an actual strike.

In my own practice, I sometimes ask my partners to tap or slap me on the head, if my movements are not appropriate to defend me properly. Similarly ,if my partner is not controlling my arm appropriately, I will sometimes demonstrate a hammer strike to the abdomen to show their vulnerability. Such techniques seem to be a way to help lead the mind intent (Yi) to change the movements, expecially for those with martial arts backgrounds who understand what danger they are putting themselves in. For those without such backgrounds, it would be good to have another tool to use.

At my current level of push hands practice, I am only a little bit concerned with free fighting, but I have become increasingly focused on small details of hand and finger placement that make it harder for my partner to disconnect. In doing applications, I am also trying to be more mindful of "connecting" and "losing" (lian/diu). This was also a reason that led me to notice your use of the fist.

Take care,
Audi

</B></font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's always pleasing to read your response which is appropriate and to the point.

Besides health and a happy short meeting, the application of Tachi quan is to protect self first and handle peacefully the possibe attack from the attacker. The vulnerability you mention is the key point and timing to practice how to protect oneself. If the practioner is mindful of this and getting improved in not letting me have any chance to impose my fist on him.
That's my purpose and he may learn something in his sensitivity. On this, I can see you had a good teacher and you have a good faith in yourself. Once one is safe in fighting, then it is important to neutralize and control the attack, which aims at creating a peaceful atomsphere to stop the fighting.

Good to talk to you.
Take care.

Fumin
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