taiji dao book

taiji dao book

Postby ruben » Fri Oct 09, 2009 10:16 pm

Hi everybody.
In Barbara Davis Taijiquan Journal, there is a new book by Zhang Yun called "the complete taiji dao". I have recently bougth it and it is a very good book.
As you know, there is very few books dedicated to sabers, especially taiji ones and this is a very complete work.
If you´d purchase it, you surely won´t regret.
Kind regards.

Rubén
ruben
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:01 am
Location: rosario, santa fe, argentina

Postby Bob Ashmore » Mon Oct 12, 2009 9:24 pm

Ruben,
Our teacher just pointed out that book to us a couple of weeks ago. I've leafed through it and it is very, very good.
I am saving my pennies by brown bagging it so I can get a copy ASAP.



[This message has been edited by Bob Ashmore (edited October 12, 2009).]
Bob Ashmore
 
Posts: 603
Joined: Wed Aug 31, 2005 6:01 am
Location: Frankfort, KY, USA

Postby ruben » Tue Oct 13, 2009 7:18 pm

Hi Bob.
This is a very good book. More than 400 pages of pure taiji dao: Applications mostly against a spear, shortly but juicy explanations about some concepts, like qi, jing and shen. Though description of form is the same as Yang Family´s, photos are different, but it doesn´t matter, I´m enjoying it very much.
ruben
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:01 am
Location: rosario, santa fe, argentina

Postby Audi » Wed Oct 28, 2009 1:50 am

Hi everyone,

I have always liked Zhang Yun's writings and so have bought the book as well. It looks to be quite interesting.

One question I have, however, concerns the focus and respect for the spear. From what I understand of European military history, the spear was not a very respected weapon, except when used in dense infantry formations, such as by the ancient Greeks and Medieval Swiss. I don't recall any significant use as a personal weapon. How come the spear was so important in China?

I have read a little about General Qi Jiguang's use of long weapons in the book A Year of No Significance, but that seemed to be used as a peasant's weapon in yet another type of dense formation.

Could it be that most bandits or marauding rebels used spears?
Audi
 
Posts: 1137
Joined: Sat Jan 27, 2001 7:01 am
Location: New Jersey, USA

Postby shugdenla » Fri Oct 30, 2009 3:57 am

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Audi:
<B>Hi everyone,
How come the spear was so important in China?

I have read a little about General Qi Jiguang's use of long weapons in the book A Year of No Significance, but that seemed to be used as a peasant's weapon in yet another type of dense formation.

Could it be that most bandits or marauding rebels used spears?</B></font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I don't recall the historical record but the spear was a static security weapon with sometime battlefield use while the personal dao (infantry) and bow/arrow from horsemen was the rule of the day, at least Qing era!
Cities probably needed the show of force of the spear hence its utility.
shugdenla
 
Posts: 209
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 6:01 am
Location: USA

Postby ruben » Fri Oct 30, 2009 9:47 pm

Hi Audi.
I don´t know the right answer. Making some speculations, I can guess that chinese spear, queen of arms for martial artists, had one difference with the west one. The pole, made of bamboo gave it the flexibility that her european sister didn´t have. And this flexibility, combined with the long range, made of this weapon something fearsome in skilfull hands.
I think bow and arrow weren´t either an important arm between ancient europeans, except a famous Saxon archers corp, but japanese people made of bow and arrow a whole art, the kyudo (the way of the bow).
ruben
 
Posts: 60
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:01 am
Location: rosario, santa fe, argentina


Return to Book and Video Recommendations

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests