form in 20 minutes?

Postby DavidJ » Wed Nov 26, 2003 12:06 am

Hi Jerry,

You quoted, > they first learned the form, gradually correcting the moves, until the moves became relatively correct, with the hands and feet placed correctly, so that the moves had basically settled into a fixed shape, the route of energy identical, lower body quite stable and only then did they learn push hands. <

This is well said. I assumed this was widely known. You need to lay the foundation before putting up the walls.

David J
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Postby Michael » Wed Nov 26, 2003 7:33 am

psalchemist,

70/30? "Na" I can't go that far. FAr as I would go is 90/10%, and that is pushing it. As my friend Jack says: "That's my story and I am sticking with it."

Each of is different, each of us respond to different triggers, but this is still mainly a "physical" art. So if we differ by a few degrees, big deal. Five years from now you may feel differently, maybe not.

I don't know, but my thoughts on a rising root after not practicing for a period, is that old bad habits begin to creep back in. One probably would find that their shoulders are being held up higher, and the hip joints are less loose.

If you are ever at a Yang seminar, you can pick me out of the crowd by that tatoo.
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Postby psalchemist » Thu Nov 27, 2003 6:59 pm

Greetings Michael,

Thanks for the reply.

I can appreciate your points of view, even if they may differ slightly presently from mine.

<Five years from now you may feel differently...maybe not.> Michael

Absolutely, tommorrow I may feel differently!...maybe not.

You wrote:
<Each of us is different, each of us responds to different triggers, but this is still mainly a "physical" art. So if we differ by a few degrees, big deal.> Michael

Yes, yes, I was just jesting about the degrees, certainly no big deal.

Your thoughts on the rising root are pretty much what I had suspected, thanks for the confirmation.

Taiji seems to combat general physical tensions quite efficiently if practiced regularly.

Best regards,
Psalchemist.



[This message has been edited by psalchemist (edited 11-27-2003).]
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Postby Gu Rou Chen » Fri Nov 28, 2003 2:54 am

A note on practice.

The most proficient masters whom I have met all describe having gone through a period of -several- years of -very- intense practice where they basically practice all day long and also have a group or several groups to practice with.

Once I acquired a Fu Zhongwen video and was viewing it in China with students of another very accomplished teacher. A female voice gave commentary as Fu did his form: "Master Fu practices no less than three hours a day." A roar of laughter filled the room. "3 hours? That's all?"

Here is a link to photos of the Yang form as done by Li Yaxuan:

The pages are in Chinese. There are three pages of photos.

http://home.pchome.com.tw/team/chhguo/yaxuan/yaxuan-1.htm
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Postby Wushuer » Fri Nov 28, 2003 11:28 pm

Psalchemist et al:
I have been absent for a while, I have been taking care of a family semi-emergency.
I will get back normal as soon as possible.

I would not dare to speak on what would be the best guide for Yang style practice. It would be better to ask your teacher what he wants you to concentrate on when doing the form.
I concentrate on different things for different styles. For YCF style, I concentrate on the ten essentials. For Wu style I concentrate on the breakdown of movement as taught to me by them.
I have found over the last few days that the thirteen posture YCF style form I learned is very good for removing tension.
More as I can.


[This message has been edited by Wushuer (edited 11-28-2003).]
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Postby Michael » Sat Nov 29, 2003 12:10 am

Wushuer,

Hope things are going well!
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Postby psalchemist » Sat Nov 29, 2003 12:26 am

Greetings Wushuer,

Sorry to hear of your family emergency...Hope everything turns out right.

Best regards,
Psalchemist.
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Postby Audi » Sun Nov 30, 2003 3:17 pm

Hi Gu Rou Chen,

Thanks for the hyperlink. It was very interesting to look at Li Yaxuan’s postures and compare them with what I have seen of others. Is this the form that you do?

I also had a question about frame 136. Do you know if this represents the culmination of Turn the Body, Sweep the Lotus? I am surprised to see the apparent lateral inclination of the torso, as judged by the height of Li’s head against the background. Also, do you know what frames 134 and 138 represent? They appear to be transitional postures, but I find difficulty understanding the orientation of the feet and the arms.

Take care,
Audi
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Postby Wushuer » Tue Dec 02, 2003 4:56 pm

Things are well, thanks for your concern. My wife had to undergo a bit of minor surgery and I had to take some time off and sit with her while she recovered. Nothing major, just time consuming and worrying to me even though I knew she'd be fine.
I did manage to get online the one time for a short time while she took a nap, but otherwise I was on duty and stayed away from the computer.
I shall be back to my normal self now and will get myself back into the boards ASAP.
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Postby psalchemist » Tue Dec 02, 2003 5:34 pm

Greetings Wushuer,

Glad to hear all turned out well in the end.

Maintaining such a dedicated vigil at anothers bedside when they are ill is a wonderful gesture.

Awww, what a nice guy. Image

Best regards,
Psalchemist.
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Postby Wushuer » Tue Dec 02, 2003 9:28 pm

Just don't let word of it get around. OK?
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Postby HengYu » Wed Dec 17, 2003 8:42 pm

A very interesting discussion. Of course, there are such things as taiji fast forms. Why? Because once the form can be practiced slowly and correct, it is only logical to test that ability by varying the tempo of the form. Mastery should be able to be manifest at any speed in the end. However, the correct performance of the form is paramount, and should be done slowly as a consequence, until mastery is acquired. And as the Yi Jing says, change happens at many different speeds.

[This message has been edited by HengYu (edited 12-18-2003).]
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