Postures and meridians

Postures and meridians

Postby lob » Thu May 27, 2004 3:26 pm

What about postures and health benefits dued to corresponding meridians (if any)?

thanx
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Postby Audi » Mon May 31, 2004 1:54 am

Hi Lob,

What exactly is your question? Or maybe, what is that prompts your question?

--Audi
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Postby lob » Mon May 31, 2004 7:43 am

Hi Audi

I was just considering the possibility that the forms (at least the oldest ones) were created with an eye to the energy circulation according to TCM.
In this regard, I guess that each posture (or small sequence of postures) should correspond to a certain meridian and that the entire circulation should be completed at the end of the form, as it actually happens with most of dynamic qigong patterns.

regards lob




[This message has been edited by lob (edited 05-31-2004).]
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Postby César » Mon May 31, 2004 4:00 pm

Hi!
I found this on the web. I hope it helps
César
Q: Are there acupuncture points stimulated by specific movements?

Chen Xiaowang: Different postures require different coordination of the muscles, resulting in different emphasis. Qi is communicated through the channels, so different results with different movements.
http://ar1.hit.bg/taijiquan/t25.htm
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Postby Audi » Fri Jun 04, 2004 12:36 am

Hi César and lob,


César, thanks for the link. I had great trouble accessing it, but it was well worth the effort. My respect for Chen Xiaowang never ceases to grow.

lob, many people seem to describe Taijiquan as if it were a martial extension of Qi Gong and/or of TCM (“traditional Chinese medicine”). From what I understand, the traditional Taiji families see the art as based on the same general theories as these practices, but as something independent of them.

I can recall receiving form corrections at various times before I began to study the Yangs’ form. Some of these corrections were described as necessary to stimulate various meridians. I specifically recall that this reasoning applied to turning the left foot inward in the Low Posture/Snake Creeps Down (“Xia4 Shi4”) and to how the hook hand was formed in Single Whip. When I began to study the Yangs’ form, I was surprised because these particular form details were taught differently from the corrections I had been given and because meridians were not discussed at all in this context.

My own view is that Yang Style Taijiquan and its parent style in the Chen family were originally designed purely for martial purposes. However, since Taiji theories are based on “naturalness” and “Yin/Yang” theory, they have an inherent affinity for health and health-related systems, including TCM and Qi Gong. A natural and efficient body and mind will be good for both health and self-defense.

Take care,
Audi
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Postby Yury Snisarenko » Fri Jun 04, 2004 5:20 am

Hi All

I completely agree with Audi and consider Taiji some independently from qigong. The fundamental martial aspect is based on jin and jin lu (jin pathways) not on qi meridians. In my view it's not necessary (but probably preferable) to know meridians "acting" in postures. And I think for health aspect it's more important meridians' balance rather than stimulating particular meridian.

However Wang Peishin had approach emphasizing meridians and acupuncture points.
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Postby Polaris » Fri Jun 04, 2004 3:11 pm

In our school we learn the martial accurately first, the "jin," and then we get into how the form balances the meridians. we are told that the hand form is designed to completely balance out the entire system once (if done correctly, of course). Kind of like "de-gaussing" the body.

We are also taught 24 separate exercises which are designed to affect specific energy systems, with names like "kidney stretch" and so on. While they do energize the meridians in specific ways, they are still presented as distillations of the energies required to fight using "soft style." My Sifu says that they didn't call the exercises "qigong" when he was a kid, they called them "Taijigong." He is the first in his family to teach these openly, in fact, his uncles were a bit miffed with him for doing so back in the 70s.

Cheers,
-P.
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Postby Audi » Sat Jun 05, 2004 11:53 am

Hi Polaris,

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Polaris:
In our school we learn the martial accurately first, the "jin," and then we get into how the form balances the meridians. we are told that the hand form is designed to completely balance out the entire system once (if done correctly, of course). Kind of like "de-gaussing" the body.</font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

This seems to validate lob's hypothesis, at least for Wu Style.